Amendment 66: More Spending Doesn’t Buy Higher Student Achievement

October 25, 2013 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-I-2013 (October 2013)
Author: Linda Gorman

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Introduction:
Parents spend their money to benefit their children. School bureaucrats spend other people’s money to benefit the schools and those who run them. Amendment 66 raises taxes to take money from working Coloradans. It gives the broken public school bureaucracy more to spend and leaves parents with less. Taking money from parents harms children.

Amendment 66: Spend More, Get Less (Part 2)

October 25, 2013 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-H-2013 (October 2013)
Author: Linda Gorman

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Introduction:
More spending does not create better schools. Many well-funded districts have lower graduation rates. Colorado Springs spent $1,500 less than Denver. It graduated 76 percent of its students, while Denver only graduated 46 percent. If passing Amendment 66 lets Denver spend $4,000 more, it might end up matching Indianapolis’s 30 percent graduation rate.

Amendment 66: Spend More, Get Less

October 10, 2013 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-G-2013 (October 2013)
Author: Linda Gorman

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Introduction:
Amendment 66 will take the money you spend to benefit your children and give it to public education bureaucrats. Education bureaucrats do not necessarily use higher funding to benefit children. They will spend it on things that they like – generous pensions, higher salaries, and more educational consultants.

The Colorado Government Pension System Introduction and Basic Organization

April 22, 2013 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-B-2013 (April 2013)
Author: Joshua Sharf

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Introduction:
Colorado’s Public Employee Retirement Association (PERA) is the State’s largest pension plan, with more than 483,000 members as of 2011. Government contributions exceeded $1 billion in FY2011.

A Thumbnail Guide to Colorado State Government’s Spending Problem

February 26, 2013 by jlongo · Leave a Comment
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IB-A-2013 (February 2013)
Author: Linda Gorman

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Introduction:
Colorado state government has a spending problem. Although inflation-adjusted per capita personal income in Colorado is still below its 2003 level, state spending has risen every year since 1999. State tax revenue has risen, but it cannot keep up with the spending.

Aurora Food Tax Changes Respect TABOR Restriction

August 7, 2012 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-2012-B (August 2012)
Author: Bob LeGare

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Introduction:
The City of Aurora amended its sales tax regulations related to candy and soft drinks, as a response to concerns raised by Aurora grocery retailers. The 2012 ordinance amendment has the appearance of a tax increase but further analysis concludes the tax policy change is likely to be “revenue neutral,” And therefore does not require voter approval under TABOR.

An Analysis Of Proposition 103

March 19, 2012 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-2011-D (October 2011)
Author: Penn Pfiffner

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Introduction:

Colorado’s Proposition 103 will raise state taxes $532 million in the first year and about $2.9 billion in the first five years.  It proposes to raise the income tax rate on individuals and families, as well as small businesses, and simultaneously to raise the state sales tax rate.  Proposition 103 is the only state issue on this fall’s ballot.

Colorado Bridge Enterprise: A Case Study in Contravening Colorado’s Constitution

May 8, 2011 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-2011-C (May 2012)
Author: Tom Ryan

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Executive Summary:

In 2009 the General Assembly passed Senate Bill 09-108, more commonly known as FASTER. Signed by Governor Bill Ritter, the bill relies on distortions and deliberate misdirections to subvert Colorado’s Constitution and silence the voice of the people. The bill depends on continued silence for its provisions to move forward. Under FASTER, Colorado families are being forced to pay an unconstitutional tax of almost $100 million annually. This tax hits everyone who registers a vehicle in the state squarely in the pocketbook—a tax that was enacted directly by the legislature without a vote of the people.

How Colorado Has Raised $300 Million in Debt Without Asking Its Citizens: The Colorado Bridge Enterprise

May 6, 2011 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-2011-B (May 2011)
Author: Richard Sokol

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Executive Summary:

Colorado’s citizens are supposed to have a final say before our state can borrow money. But the 2009 FASTER law subverted citizens’ rights to vote on tax and debt issues. The law allows an unelected group of bureaucrats to appoint an unelected administrator and together borrow whatever amounts of debt can be backed by FASTER funds. On December 1, 2010, they did just that. And now Colorado’s citizens are burdened with $300 million of newly issued debt—with the promise of more to come. Because of the borrowed money, it is unlikely a future legislature can ever repeal the FASTER tax. All this, and we weren’t asked!

Debt Detective

May 5, 2009 by admin · Leave a Comment
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IB-2009-E (May 2009)
Author: Luke Jackson

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Executive Summary:
Our research found that information on local government debt is available to the public … on two conditions. First, citizens must have Sherlock Holmes-like instincts. Information about local debt can be found, but plan on digging for it. And, second, the results of your search may yield information that is considerably outdated.

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